How to be a man

I’m not a man (shocking, I know!) but I did once dress like one for a costume party. (The man I dressed as would become my husband. How’s that for a rare pickup line?)

That, in no way, makes me an expert on how to be a man, which is why I’m grateful for Tony Dungy’s recent book “Uncommon.”

When I decided to read it as part of the Tyndale Summer Reading Program, I didn’t realize it was directed at men. Though, I shouldn’t have been surprised. Dungy is, after all, a household football name.

I almost stopped reading after the first couple of references to “being a man,” but I decided to stay the course. I’m a mother to a son, who blessedly, has his father in his life. But I thought it might be wise to glean some insights for the future.

Dungy offers a ton of wisdom, not all of it new or profound, but the book is gripping, and Dungy speaks with authority. In a dadless age, he offers a voice of paternal support, blending compassion and a call to discipline and respect with ease. He comes across as the kind of guy who will tell you how things are, good or bad, and you still like him afterward.

I’d consider this book a must-read for teenage boys, whether athletes or not, or young adolescent boys without a father in the picture, and the moms who raise them. Dads, grab this book for a good read, too. Especially if you feel like you’ve messed up and have no earthly advice to offer your sons.

I was surprised by how much I learned from a book aimed at men. It may not have taught me, personally, how to be one, but I’m inspired to raise my son to be the best man he can be.

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2 thoughts on “How to be a man

  1. I also loved Tyndale’s Two Wars by Nate Self, the true life story of a Special Ops soldier in Afghanistan. Don’t know if it is still a free e-book download, but it too should be a must read for teen boys and young men in need of those lessons of courage, honor, faithfulness, etc. Nate’s life as an Army Ranger officer exemplifies. And likewise as a woman reader, I too learned as much from a book directed primarily to men. One gender does not after all have a premium on great character traits.

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